Category: psychology

“‘History is not the past. History is the past in so far as it is historicised in the present’”

“‘History is not the past. History is the past in so far as it is historicised in the present’”

Jacques Lacan, The Seminar of Jacques Lacan, Book 1: Freud’s Papers on Technique 1953-1954

Lacan, Graphs of desire

Lacan, Graphs of desire

“Follow your heart but take your brain with you.”

“Follow your heart but take your brain with you.”

Alfred Adler

Freud the philosopherBefore fathering psychoanalysis, Freud…

Freud the philosopher

Before fathering psychoanalysis, Freud first slayed the dominant Cartesian intellectual tradition of mind-body dualism

By David Livingstone Smith

Most people think of Sigmund Freud as a psychologist or a psychiatrist. But he was neither. He was trained as a neuroscientist and went on to create a new discipline that he called ‘psychoanalysis’. But Freud should also be thought of as a philosopher – and a deeply insightful and prescient one at that. As the philosopher of science Clark Glymour observed in 1991:

Freud’s writings contain a philosophy of mind, and indeed a philosophy of mind that addresses many of the issues about the mental that nowadays concern philosophers and ought to concern psychologists. Freud’s thinking about the issues in the philosophy of mind is better than much of what goes on in contemporary philosophy, and it is sometimes as good as the best …

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“I have always tried to make room for anything that wanted to come to me from within.”

“I have always tried to make room for anything that wanted to come to me from within.”

Carl Jung

“Growing up means separating oneself from people to be able to be with them: by including myself into…”

“Growing up means separating oneself from people to be able to be with them: by including myself into the scene I can separate from it.”

http://twitter.com/AndreVantino/status/844110111396286464 (via andre-vantino)

FLOW: In positive psychology, flow, also known as the zone, is…

FLOW: 

In positive psychology, flow, also known as the zone, is the mental state of operation in which a person performing an activity is fully immersed in a feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and enjoyment in the process of the activity. In essence, flow is characterized by complete absorption in what one does and loses sense of space and time.

https://www.ted.com/talks/mihaly_csikszentmihalyi_on_flow

“There is no coming to consciousness without pain. People will do anything, no matter how absurd, in…”

“There is no coming to consciousness without pain. People will do anything, no matter how absurd, in order to avoid facing their own Soul. One does not become enlightened by imagining figures of light, but by making the darkness conscious.”

C.G. Jung

A Theory of Reality as More Than the Sum of Its PartsNew math…

A Theory of Reality as More Than the Sum of Its Parts

New math shows how, contrary to conventional scientific wisdom, conscious beings and other macroscopic entities might have greater influence over the future than does the sum of their microscopic components.

By Natalie Wolchover

In his 1890 opus, The Principles of Psychology, William James invoked Romeo and Juliet to illustrate what makes conscious beings so different from the particles that make them up.

“Romeo wants Juliet as the filings want the magnet; and if no obstacles intervene he moves towards her by as straight a line as they,” James wrote. “But Romeo and Juliet, if a wall be built between them, do not remain idiotically pressing their faces against its opposite sides like the magnet and the filings. … Romeo soon finds a circuitous way, by scaling the wall or otherwise, of touching Juliet’s lips directly.”

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Are People Rational?John Ongley investigates what Bertrand…

Are People Rational?

John Ongley investigates what Bertrand Russell thought about human reason.

The economist John Maynard Keynes once said of his Cambridge friends in the years before World War I – including the philosophers Bertrand Russell and G.E. Moore – that while their conversations were all bright, amusing and clever, there was “no solid diagnosis of human nature underlying them.” His friends, he claimed, had believed that the human race “consists of reliable, rational, decent people, influenced by truth and objective standards,” failing to see that there were “insane and irrational springs of wickedness” in people. Keynes thought this view was naïve. “Bertie in particular,” Keynes said of Russell, “sustained simultaneously a pair of opinions ludicrously incompatible. He held that in fact human affairs were carried on after a most irrational fashion, but that the remedy was quite simple and easy, since all we had to do was to carry them on rationally” (Keynes, Two Memoirs, 1946, pp.99-103).

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